Author Topic: Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)  (Read 4954 times)

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Offline si404

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Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« on: February 05, 2017, 09:39:16 am »
I just hope they're added soon along with autonomical roads, they are a big part of the road network of my country. I couldn't believe that they hadn't been added yet.
Given it's a huge and fairly complex system, it's unsurprising that we haven't done it. It took me over 100 hours just to bring the autovia/pista system up to date two summers ago. Most of the routes were already mapped (though I had to tweak them to fit better mapping data), and it took that long!

We're talking at least 10 working weeks worth of work for just the roads with N numbers. And you are surprised that we haven't already added not only them, but the Autonomous Community Roads (presumably just the Red- and Orange-signed ones)? This is a volunteer-maintained site!

They are on my to-do-list, but the Spanish road network is daunting and there's other pressures on my TravelMapping time, which is getting smaller and smaller. Gone are the summers where I can spend two weeks of 8-hour days and then several hours a day for most days in the rest of a three-month period that allowed the bringing up-to-date of most of Europe, and the creation of many of Europe's tier 4 systems: most of which took less than a working week's worth of work to bring to activation.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2017, 01:27:22 pm by michih »

Offline peperodriguez2710

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Re: Spain Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2017, 04:19:22 pm »

If you want them added, you gotta step up and help out with them yourself. That's how I got started with maintaining Washington state. It was clear nobody was going to fix any of the issues I reported, so the only way they were going to get fixed is if I took over maintenance of Washington. If you're interested in helping out, I would suggest PMing Jim.

Mod edit: Sorry I clicked the wrong button and accidentally edited your post! I meant to quote your post, not edit it.
Given it's a huge and fairly complex system, it's unsurprising that we haven't done it. It took me over 100 hours just to bring the autovia/pista system up to date two summers ago. Most of the routes were already mapped (though I had to tweak them to fit better mapping data), and it took that long!

We're talking at least 10 working weeks worth of work for just the roads with N numbers. And you are surprised that we haven't already added not only them, but the Autonomous Community Roads (presumably just the Red- and Orange-signed ones)? This is a volunteer-maintained site!

They are on my to-do-list, but the Spanish road network is daunting and there's other pressures on my TravelMapping time, which is getting smaller and smaller. Gone are the summers where I can spend two weeks of 8-hour days and then several hours a day for most days in the rest of a three-month period that allowed the bringing up-to-date of most of Europe, and the creation of many of Europe's tier 4 systems: most of which took less than a working week's worth of work to bring to activation.

I understand what you're talking about, and I'm so sorry that I wrote in that impatient way (English isn't my first language and in Spanish "I can't believe it" hasn't the same strongness as in English). I'm also in several projects and I know that sometimes there's not enough time for everything, and I would get involved if I wasn't busy with them. Because of that, I prefer to wait until that systems are implemented or I have time to do it myself, though there's no need to hurry, I can be patient :)
Anyway, if you have any doubt regarding Spanish road systems, I'll be glad to answer it!

Sorry another time, and have a nice day!

Offline si404

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Re: Spain Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2017, 05:02:40 pm »
Don't worry about. Actually your request reminds me that a couple of years ago, I got a request to do India's National Highways. I spent three days doing the Asian Highways in India with the plan to some day do the National Highways (or allow someone else to do it easily) and replied to the request that I'd done this for now and there would be more to come at some point in the medium term. One person - not the one who asked for Indian Roads - has under 30km of 3000km (at least) travelled and that's it.  :-[ I'm not doing the national highways system - not least as India was a chore to do.

At least Spanish National Highways will get some usage!

Offline michih

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Re: Spain Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2017, 02:57:03 am »
16 users drove Spanish autovias (espa) and 28 users drove Italian autostradas (itaa). I think both countries are it worth to get a tier 4 system (In addition, I have some mileage on both systems and I wanna travel to Spain again this spring). Dunno about Greece (grceo in development) but only 4 user have grca mileage.

I think Spain and Italy are the last remaining big European gaps which are not yet covered on that level. Potential national road networks are espn + itass. However, both systems are large and signage is quite bad. It makes it hard to draft the routes. See previous discussion about Italy:

If we want to introduce the SS Italian system,

Of course, we want! It's just a matter of having a full list of signed roads et cetera.....

Quote
I think the only sensible way to do that is consider the entire road, not considering the "downgraded" sections that are handled by provinces, otherwise you'll end up with a road segmented in tens of small stretches far away from each other and with little meaning. This would be quite easy, since for instance Italian Wikipedia lists all of them in their original configuration.

Do the rededicated sections have a new number, like SP123 (signed or unsigned)?

It depends on the Region or Province that now handles them. Some provinces keep the number of the SS road and only change the prefix; some others change also the number, some others leave the entire name as before or add prefixes and/or suffixes.

I think the central issue is that we only cover signed roads. Drafting espn or itass would require a time-consuming GSV search...

On the other hand, I thought beln has a similar problem but it applied to the A,B,C,... segments of 1-digit N roads only...
Signage at roads which only lead to the actually numbered road is quite common all over Europe... except some (northern) countries with dotted edge.

Are there minimum lists containing all espn or itass routes? Or official maps like available for Norway, Sweden, Bavaria et cetera?

Offline peperodriguez2710

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Re: Spain Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2017, 03:33:25 pm »
(...)
Are there minimum lists containing all espn or itass routes? Or official maps like available for Norway, Sweden, Bavaria et cetera?
If you want a list of all national roads in Spain, there's a list in the Spanish Wikipedia, and other from the government:
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anexo:Carreteras_Nacionales_de_Espa%C3%B1a
http://www.fomento.gob.es/NR/rdonlyres/BFE3720F-F919-4ADA-9CCA-BC6F99FD8EEB/137467/Informe4.pdf (All roads staring with N-, if they only have a number (like [N-1], [N-3a]...) it should be written in roman ([N-I], [N-IIIa]) though listed as regular ones, because that's how they're signed actually; more info below.
http://www.fomento.gob.es/NR/rdonlyres/F61F9F71-8FF6-4494-81C0-1FB1A0AED9A5/139812/MapaIntensidad_2015.pdf a map with traffic data from 2015, it also shows the road numbers of almost all the national roads without seeing the dense low tier autonomical network.

Some additional information:

-All national roads in Spain use the letter N- in white over red as indicator. We use roman numbers for the radial ones, that were the first ones to be built ([N-I], [N-II], [N-III], [N-IV], [N-V] and [N-VI] and three digit numbers for the rest [N-XXX], assigned according to the sector where they are (sectors are marked by the radial ones). If you find roads in red indicators but without the N-, (like the C-12, for example) they aren't national roads, but autonommical roads from some regions that use the color red for their first class roads.

-As the most busy stretches of them have been converted to motorways, they can be intermittent sometimes. That is especially common with the radial ones, as most of the times the new radial motorway ([N-I] -> [A-1], [N-II] -> [A-2], ...) was built OVER the old radial national road and only mountain pass stretches and parts entering into villages remain as the original road. Other times, the old road is preserved as a service road for the new motorway and runs parallel from it. If a new motorway is built following the route of a national road, it usually (not always) takes its first two numbers ([N-501] -> [A-50], [N-540] -> [A-54], ...) this can be useful when searching for missing ones.

-Sometimes, national roads are transferred to autonomous communities and change denominations, so some of the list could be very short, intermitent or no longer exist. Trust in the signs, mileposts, and panels posted seen in Street View.

-National roads are only present in mainland Spain AND the African enclave of Ceuta. Do not bother to look into the Canary and Balearics, they're all autonomical there.

-When a national road is duplicated (for example, when bypassing a village that the road used to cross), a letter (usually a) is added after the number in one of the stretches to differentiate it (like N-IVa]. Very seldomly, the letter is added in capitals or after a -. They keep being considerated the same road as before. Other times letters are added for administrative reasons sometimes and appear with letters in road lists, but usually that extra letters aren't used actually; so trust in the signs, mileposts, and panels posted seen in Street View.

If there's any doubt, feel free to ask
« Last Edit: February 19, 2017, 04:04:39 pm by peperodriguez2710 »

Offline michih

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Re: Spain Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2017, 01:24:06 pm »
@Si: What do you think about cutting a deal for espn like we've done for norfv*?

@Pepe: If you wanna help, you could check on GSV if the routes are really signed. Post GSV links from the beginning and end of each segment. Let's start with N-I to N-VI which might be the most difficult routes.

*First batch done (Fv7-Fv98 = norfv0), only wait for your latest E/Rv fix upload to bring it to preview.

Offline si404

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Re: Spain Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2017, 09:33:46 am »
@Si: What do you think about cutting a deal for espn like we've done for norfv*?
What, you make it, but I maintain it and continue to maintain it? Sure.

Offline michih

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Re: Spain Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2017, 01:20:39 pm »
Yep :)

Offline peperodriguez2710

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Re: Spain Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2017, 04:52:12 pm »

@Pepe: If you wanna help, you could check on GSV if the routes are really signed. Post GSV links from the beginning and end of each segment. Let's start with N-I to N-VI which might be the most difficult routes.


Of course, I'll send the links asap!

Offline peperodriguez2710

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Re: Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2017, 01:09:28 pm »
Sorry for double posting! Here's N-I:

N-I:
[spoiler]
Before listing the stretches, I notice that there are some roads listed in Google Maps as N-I that aren't part of it at the moment (some of them became autovias which got replaced later and the remaining stretches lost their numbering, other parts are now autonommical roads, etc.).And as in most radial roads, when they got replaced with the motorway, sometimes their signs were removed, so trust me, I'll use anyway other indicators that the road was there.
Another important notice: the A-1 motorway (which replaced the N-I and was called N-I at first because it usually was built over the old road) is usually still signed as N-I in the Basque Country (and the same happens with other antional roads converted into motorways), but it's NOT PART of the actual N-I but from the A-1 (Stupid politicians...). Simply, don't count N-I if it's signed with blue backgrounds along it.
Ok, here we start:
1 - A stretch that wasn't converted into motorway because they wanted to bypass the villages the N-I crossed. It starts in the crossing between the M-608, N-320 and A-1, crosses Venturada, bypasses Cabanillas de la Sierra, crosses under the A-1 to serve as service road, returns to the other side to pass through La Cabrera and ends abruptly in the curve of a minor road because it used to continue straight, but the motorway was built over it (exactly here, notice the old markings and the rest of asphalt at the front. This stretch is not signed as N-I in guide signs though there are some things that tell us that this still belongs to the N-I. First, that it's the main street of all the towns it crosses (in Cabanillas it used to be, look at Calle Real), it ends into the motorway, the pavement in non repaved parts looks torn out because of the heavy traffic that passed here before they built the motorway and we can still find old signage telling us that this is the N-I, like these milemarkers telling that this is the km 54: https://goo.gl/maps/o67MPT8jND32
2 - Same as the previous one, starts in the exit 72 of the A-1, continues as a service road, enters into Buitrago del Lozoya, crosses Venta de Mea and merges abruptly into the A-1 here. Same circumstances as the previous one, here some signs and mile markers telling that we're on a part of the N-I:
https://goo.gl/maps/AAUTssvBJwD2
https://goo.gl/maps/5aqgE3Ns9M32
https://goo.gl/maps/9rf4BRqHb2M2

3 - This stretch was also kept for bypassing the towns that crossed it and because of the geographical conditions: there's a mountain pass there and they couldn't simply convert it. It starts from this dead end (because the motorway was built over the previous part), crosses Robregordo, passes over the motorway, runs through Somosierra, coronating its mountain pass and continues straight as a service road for the different fields there, ending in this sudden dead end created by the motorway.
Along with the things mentioned before, it's worth noticing that there are many three lane stretches, which reminds us that this was a very busy radial road in the past part. Here some more kilometer markers and milestones showing the numbering, the first ones quite new indeed:
https://goo.gl/maps/akYNYHpTybv
https://goo.gl/maps/Yxi6zbEf94L2
https://goo.gl/maps/ECiK2GHFHEs
https://goo.gl/maps/vEDUAMwizEz
https://goo.gl/maps/kK5pNG9vBkm
https://goo.gl/maps/gN1G2zk3BCr

4 - This section, which is wrongly tagged as N-110 in Google Maps, is another one that was bypassed, this time not by the motorway, but by the own N-I, and then the bypass got upgraded into a motorway. The stretch that runs through the village is named N-Ia accordingly, though remember that the suffix only denotes an alternate itinerary, not a different road. It starts in A-1 exit 100, continues until the village of Cerezo de Abajo, and crosses it to end in this roundabout connecting with the A-1 and N-110. We can also find three lane parts on this stretch. Here some more kilometer markers clearly showing the N-1a numbering, and there's even a sign showing distances!:
https://goo.gl/maps/bX66DqVzXcU2
https://goo.gl/maps/54c3z8KYbWT2
https://goo.gl/maps/saMaZAdJKCu

5 - Here, other stretch bypassed, quite short actually, starts in A-1 exit 109, gives access to Castillejo de Mesleón, and after a crossing turns into a very dilapidated road (but that certainly looks as that it has been a major road in the past) and ends suddenly into a dead end created by the motorway. Unfortunately, no signage remains of this stretch, though it's quite clear that in the past was a part of the N-I (starts and ends in the motorway, three lane stretches making it a very wide road for the area it serves now, and we can also see lots of restaurants, hostels and shops (most of them closed now) which remind us that this was once a busy major road.

6 - Another bypassed section, starting at the A-1 exit 115, crosses Boceguillas and ends into the motorway too.
Here some kilometer marker signs and a milestone:
https://goo.gl/maps/QpC2eNY2xd12
https://goo.gl/maps/1H4ayWQyGnv
https://goo.gl/maps/jPetQjgawKR2
https://goo.gl/maps/kXWqFde6zJK2

7 - This bypassed stretch, quite long, starts at this roundabout (note the guide sign with the road number) connecting A-1 exits 146 and 147 with the village of Milagros and crossing it, then passing through Fuentespina, after that there's an interchange with the A-11 motorway , encircles the town of Aranda de Duero (though in the past it ran straight through the heart of it), gives access to Monte Costaján and merges finally into the A-1.
This section is also plenty of kilometer markers and milestones, along with guide signs:
https://goo.gl/maps/KXxNnR1uH9n
https://goo.gl/maps/6pjF6SX9P2v
https://goo.gl/maps/R9J1taTbgT22
https://goo.gl/maps/RDUuvNim3t12
https://goo.gl/maps/hyj9mwDCPLy
https://goo.gl/maps/j2dFMWyGkTF2
https://goo.gl/maps/DHAA5g2C5RR2
https://goo.gl/maps/kPAkDS8G5yN2
https://goo.gl/maps/tMi32RMAU222
https://goo.gl/maps/feNbNjaanoF2 (a reassurance sign)
https://goo.gl/maps/S5Bz2oiDbLM2 (a distance one)
https://goo.gl/maps/VhZexgvDXwr (same, southbound)
https://goo.gl/maps/8UtTkX8g6zv (the N-Ia in this case refers to the streets where the road used to go through in Aranda de Duero until it was bypassed (the bypass is what today is N-I), add it if you believe it's important)
https://goo.gl/maps/r3JAnSU43z12
https://goo.gl/maps/cqFmYGqABJD2 (here the works of the N-I/A-11 interchange, now the A-11 is finished but GSV hasn't been updated, here you can see one of the guide signs in that motorway, leading to N-Ihttps://goo.gl/maps/rEDSxA52srT2, bad quality is because this is seen from the A-1 in its own interchange with A-11)
https://goo.gl/maps/ZjB1FVzUvmr
https://goo.gl/maps/o6fue81qHbo
https://goo.gl/maps/3UztNJMYwSF2
https://goo.gl/maps/vbykAnbFh2q
https://goo.gl/maps/b5Cp4y431un
https://goo.gl/maps/HvznHRM8E5n
https://goo.gl/maps/siQDiojqRuT2
https://goo.gl/maps/GpAY4dBehf82
https://goo.gl/maps/85ZvtTto8Rq
https://goo.gl/maps/FGUtbi1Yfd92
https://goo.gl/maps/Dz61FP3jS1F2
https://goo.gl/maps/hqfhYVUhk7F2
https://goo.gl/maps/v1uKqj3osqE2
https://goo.gl/maps/tCTMZsqXhXQ2
https://goo.gl/maps/gZseocVpTbU2

8 - Another short bypassed stretch, starts at this dead end, gives access to Gumiel de Izán and ends in this roundabout with the 171 exit of the A-1.
Here a milestone telling that this is part of the N-I
https://goo.gl/maps/LjMvtbR7J3m (it looks brand new though being more than 60 years old!)

9 - Other short section bypassed, starting in this curve (note the old road going straight), passes under the motorway, passes through the village of Quintanilla de la Mata and ends in this roundabout connecting it to A-1 exits 198.
Here a kilometer sign showing this stretch is part of N-I:
https://goo.gl/maps/Ygcqyh23GCE2

10 - Other stretch bypassed, starts in the A-1 exit 200, goes straight into the town of Lerma, crosses with N-622 and merges with the A-1.
Kilometer signs:
https://goo.gl/maps/xZkiEjxqiUD2
https://goo.gl/maps/XRhWeNL1uqr
https://goo.gl/maps/JacwPYnvceE2

11 - This looong section starts as the other ones, bypassed, for avoiding the city of Burgos. Most of the streets where N-I passed through have been transferred to the city, so now the N-I in the city starts at this crossing , then after exiting the city; A-1 motorway ends and merges into the N-I while there's an alternate fast route using the AP-1 tollway. After crossing many towns and villages, just before entering the Basque Country the road turns another time into the A-1 motorway in a roundabout.

12 - This is the last section I found so far. It's wrongly signed as A-3310 at the beginning, but that's another road which crosses this stretch later. Here's, for example, a confirmation sign some meter later showing this is the N-I actually (though wrongly signed as N-1). More and more milestones confirm us that. Here's the actual A-3310. Then, the road continues as N-I without any wrong sign now. After a while, it turns into a dual carriageway road that probably was an attempt at doing an autovia in the 70s and ends bifurcating exactly here. This milepost ensures us that that last part was also a section from the N-I.
[/spoiler]

N-II will come soon!
« Last Edit: March 01, 2017, 05:13:45 am by peperodriguez2710 »

Offline michih

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Re: Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2017, 04:11:07 pm »
Wow, thanks :)

I've drafted the first 6 routes: https://github.com/TravelMapping/HighwayData/pull/1134. Should be in the HB with the next update Jim is running.

I've started with no. 1-4, 6 and 7 because unsigned (no. 5) routes are generally excluded (I'll continue with no. 8 tomorrow).

Your info is quite good :) It's not necessary to post so many links like you've done for no. 7. Just the "first" and "last" relevant one or from locations where the route is not clear (the 6 routes drafted are clear because they are on OSM and GM). It would help, if you could generally add the motorway exit number or cross road numbering from the beginning and end of each route. If the road is parallel to a motorway, I usually begin and end at the interchange even if there is a "little gap", e.g. the ramps from a roundabout to the motorway carriageways. Maybe I'll omit "dead ends", for instance, "NIRob" ends at exit 92. We don't include "old alignments" but signed routes only.

@Si:
1. Do you think the routes drafted are fine?
2. What do you think about exit 76 (NIBui), should we move it to the other ramp? Generally, do you wanna do modifications like this (how to report) or should I do it?

Offline peperodriguez2710

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Re: Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2017, 06:54:32 am »
Wow, thanks :)

I've drafted the first 6 routes: https://github.com/TravelMapping/HighwayData/pull/1134. Should be in the HB with the next update Jim is running.

I've started with no. 1-4, 6 and 7 because unsigned (no. 5) routes are generally excluded (I'll continue with no. 8 tomorrow).

Your info is quite good :) It's not necessary to post so many links like you've done for no. 7. Just the "first" and "last" relevant one or from locations where the route is not clear (the 6 routes drafted are clear because they are on OSM and GM). It would help, if you could generally add the motorway exit number or cross road numbering from the beginning and end of each route. If the road is parallel to a motorway, I usually begin and end at the interchange even if there is a "little gap", e.g. the ramps from a roundabout to the motorway carriageways. Maybe I'll omit "dead ends", for instance, "NIRob" ends at exit 92. We don't include "old alignments" but signed routes only.

@Si:
1. Do you think the routes drafted are fine?
2. What do you think about exit 76 (NIBui), should we move it to the other ramp? Generally, do you wanna do modifications like this (how to report) or should I do it?

Ok, thanks for your work, I'll do my best!

Offline michih

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Re: Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2017, 02:26:56 pm »
I've added the remaining N-I routes no. 8 to 12 and no. 13 from A1 exit 405 to GI-11 near the AP1/AP8 interchange (mostly concurrent with existing E5).

Offline peperodriguez2710

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Re: Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2017, 05:26:56 am »
Hello again! Here's N-II!
N-II:
1 - A bypassed section starting at this stub and ending in a roundabout with CM-2011 and A-2 exit 73 . Unfortunately, no signage has been preserved, but it's quite clear that this is a part of N-II (abrupt ending because of the motorway, the name "Ctra. Zaragoza" (Zaragoza's the next big city N-II crossed) and the strange wide for a service road.

2 - Other bypassed section, starting here, where it merges with the A-2 motorway; here a dilapidated distance sign covered with grafitti (the top reads N-II, though it's quite blurry), and after crossing Algora, another one along with a milestone, for ending in this roundabout connecting A-2 exit 113.

3 - Other bypassed stretch, wrongly labeled as N-IIa, starts at the roundabout between A-2 exit 118 and an unnamed short road towards GU-118. Then, enters Torremocha del Campo for ending as a motorway ramp here. Here's a kilometer sign.

4 - A bypassed section giving acces to the village of Sauca, starts at A-2 exit 126 and ends in exit 129. A kilometer signs tells us that this is part of N-II.

5 - Another bypassed one, starting at A-2 exit 141, passes through Esteras de Medinaceli and ends in exit 144.

6 - This other, for avoiding the town of Medinaceli and other villages, starts at exit 145, crosses the modern part of the town, passes under the A-15, then under the A-2, crosses the villages of Lodares, Jubera, Somaén and Arcos de Jalón and ends in this roundabout for merging into the A-2. There is a big amount of signage in this section, even street one.

7 - Another bypassed stretch, starting at exit 177, giving access to Santa María de la Huerta and ending at the merge here . Here two signs, just before it.

8 - This section, which is wrongly labeled as Z-V-3511 (though there's no signage in the stretch as Z-V-35119), starts at A-2 exit 190 and ends at this bridge which covers it. Here, these kilometer signs  tell us that we're actually in the N-IIa, and also does this one.

9 - This long stretch (one part of it N-II and the other N-IIa) starts at exit 204, gives access to the village of Contamina, crosses Alhama de Aragón, Bubierca, Ateca, Terrer, Calatayud and, after interchanging with A-2 (exit 242), becomes a parallel service road to separe some meters later. Then, it gives access to Aluenda and returns to the motorway at exit 252. Some extra kilometer signage tell us this is part of N-II:https://goo.gl/maps/sUhzbwgP8nG2, https://goo.gl/maps/hcMJCHeZXDp

10 - This section starts at A-2 exit 260 (here a confirmation sign later telling this is N-IIa), enters La Almunia de Doña Godina, passes under the motorway and ends in exit 273. Extra sign if needed: https://goo.gl/maps/svrEh87rjUB2

11 - This stretch starts at the merging in exit 296, crosses La Muela and becomes detoured to the north because of the access to exit 299. Then, it passes through a tunnel and ends in a roundabout with exit 301. Direction signs ommit this is N-II, but this kilometer sign  (close to the merging) and this other one (in the tunnel entrance) tell us we're on N-II.

12 - This section, that goes through the heart of the city of Zaragoza, starts at the A-2/Z-40 interchange as an avenue going straight into the city and ending in a roundabout with Vía de la Hispanidad and Av. de Madrid. The road used to continue through the later, but now that street it's transferred to the city. This kilometer sign tells us this last section is also N-II.

13 - This one starts at Z-40 exit 15 , crosses some industrial areas, goes through La Puebla de Alfindén and Alfajarín, and then the A-2 interchanges with it, becoming the AP-2 tollway after that, making the N-II the main toll-free route in the area and creating huge truck traffic over it. After, it gives access to Nuez de Ebro, ARA-A1 autonomical motorway, Villafranca de Ebro and Osera de Ebro, crosses Bujaraloz, Peñalba and Candasnos. When the A-2 returns, N-II separes to the north for crossing Fraga, passes over the motorway to continue as a service road in both sides of the A-2 until the roundabout with exit 447, where it separes to serve Alcarrás and enters Lleida, where it ends in a roundabout with LL-11 (which is a renumbering of N-II actually hahah).

14 - A long section. Just when LL-11 ends merging into the A-2, its exit 1 returns us to the N-II (kilometer sign just after it), enters Bell- Lloc d'Urgell, Sidamunt, Mollerussa, Golmés, Bellpuig, where in A-2 exit 498, (which also links to it) turns into a service road in both sides of the motorway. After some kilometers, separes for giving access to Vilagrasa and Tàrrega, where another time turns into A-2 service road while linking with an exit (510), separes another time for going to Cervera, runs parallel to the motorway for several kilometers, arribes to Jorba and in A-2 exit 549 does the same as in exits 498 and 510 until exit 551, where it separes for serving Igualada, and merges with A-2 when arribing to Ca n'Alzina. This sign leading there shows us that's N-II.

15 - This strecth starts at A-2 exit 564 and is signed as N-IIz, as this signs a bit further down shows. After linking with A-2 in exit 570 becomes a service road of it, separes to serve Bruc and ends in exit 572. A kilometer marker just before the exit 572 shows us this is still N-II.

16 - N-II reappears in this roundabout in a suburb of Barcelona called Martorell, continues through a industrial area and the Barcelonese conurbations of Sant Andreu de la Barca and Pallejà, to merge with the N-340 before Can Ros. Here a sign in the opposite direction of the interchange.

17 - In this crossing in Mongat, near Badalona, N-II returns as this sign tells us. After a while, it links with exit 216 of C-31, then links in a roundabout with the B-20 and C-32 (as this sign shows), passes through El Masnou, Premià de Mar and Vilassar de Mar, to finally merge with C-32 to bypass Mataró.

18 - Although the merging with C-32 in the previous stretch, the road used to go through the city before the bypass and this itinerary is still signed as N-II, so what we have here is that the N-II here divides to either bypass or cross Mataró. Then, the stretch would start in that division, but going straight up.
Althought it's not signed in the division (probably to encourage drivers to go through the bypass and make traffic inside the city lighter) several signs tell us that it goes through the city:
In a roundabout with B-40 located a bit after the division: https://goo.gl/maps/UTnganQe6G72
In another roundabout with a street: https://goo.gl/maps/eZ9NQFVs3PQ2
In the Plaça Laietana roundabout (both ways): https://goo.gl/maps/KxfYS67qMRx, https://goo.gl/maps/3MAu6j8Qynw
And in several more (like in the one with Ronda Barceló), that I'm not gonna post for avoiding an excess of links.
After exiting Mataró through Avinguda del Maresme returns to have its typical wide (here a kilometer sign), goes through Can Sanç, Arenys de Mar (where it crosses with C-61), Canet de Mar, Sant Pol de Mar, Calella and Pineda de Mar, gives access to Malgrat de Mar, interchanges with C-32 in its exit 130, serves Tordera and Sant Pere, interchanges with C-35 and C-63, and after interchanging turns finally into the A-2 motorway (both ways): https://goo.gl/maps/BZaAMyiBxqK2, https://goo.gl/maps/pyF2zs6j1GN2

19 - When A-2 ends near the city of Girona, N-II reappears in both N-II and N-IIa (according to their itinerary, N-IIa crosses the city and N-II bypasses it). In this stretch we are going to focus on N-IIa. After the end of the A-2, N-IIa starts here, crosses industrial areas and suburbs, goes under the C-65, crosses the town through Carrer Barcelona (Barcelona street, here's a sign), Gran Via de Jaume I and Avinguda de França (France Avenue), (here some signs at this street: https://goo.gl/maps/6UX654CdPum, https://goo.gl/maps/zToxMSrsuU22) and merges finally into N-II (both ways): https://goo.gl/maps/y6zGQDFBtYR2, https://goo.gl/maps/hH99E6gBhr92.

20 - When A-2 ends near the city of Girona, N-II reappears in both N-II and N-IIa (according to their itinerary, N-IIa crosses the city and N-II bypasses it). In this stretch we are going to focus on N-II. After the end of the A-2, N-II starts here, interchanges with C-65, then with C-66 and then N-IIa merges into it. After that, goes through Medinyà, links to AP-7, crosses Bàscara, and, before arriving to Figueres, also divides into N-IIa. We'll cover that N-IIa stretch that goes right into Figueres (N-II bypasses it) in section 21. After that, gives access to El Pont del Príncep, interchanges with C-31, C-260, N-260, N-IIa (it merges here) and AP-7 in its exits 3 and 2, crosses the town of La Junquera, interchanges with AP-7 another time in its exit 1 and arrives to the border town of El Pertús, where it ends in the border with France, where it turns into the D900 (both ways): https://goo.gl/maps/7MDBrC8Eouu, https://goo.gl/maps/WER1JUV3ho22 .

21 - N-IIa, which crosses Figueres instead of bypassing it, starts in this division of the N-II , crosses with C-26 and C-31, enters the town where it crosses with N-260 (a street sign in N-260 showing that it crosses the town) and merges finally with N-II (both ways): https://goo.gl/maps/suB8P72NkdU2 , https://goo.gl/maps/N8Pg3pXpFts.

BTW, one of the stretches of N-I that you added (NI (Beasain)) isn't part actually of N-I though being signed as that, but from A-1, as I explained before. Furthermore, new signage erected there shows A-1.

N-III will come soon!
« Last Edit: March 01, 2017, 06:10:33 am by peperodriguez2710 »

Offline michih

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Re: Spain Carretera Nacionales (espn)
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2017, 11:59:08 am »
BTW, one of the stretches of N-I that you added (NI (Beasain)) isn't part actually of N-I though being signed as that, but from A-1, as I explained before. Furthermore, new signage erected there shows A-1.

I've discussed this issue with Si in 2015. He wrote that the section is N-I according to TM rules. Routes are to be called like they are signed.